Humidity Cell Testing

by | Apr 3, 2020 | News, Soil Analyses

Humidity Cells are a kinetic test that subjects a soil sample to varying conditions as part of an advanced weathering technique. This technique involves flooding the sample, collecting leachate, and aerating it using extremely high and low relative humidity air in weekly cycles for at least 20 weeks. The rock chemistry changes in response to these stimuli and is observed in the analysis of the weekly leachates that are produced. Acid generating potential and neutralizing potential is observed as the sample ages as well as the overall water quality of the leachate. Combined with the data from static and mineralogical tests, the Humidity Cell test offered by SVL provides a powerful tool for clients to use in their predictive modeling of Acid Rock Drainage (ARD) conditions.

Humidity Cells frequently run 20 weeks. Your unique project can customize the duration, analytical tests, and specifics of the humidity cell test. Humidity cell testing is performed in accordance with ASTM D5744-07e1 and following all accreditation quality standards. You can have confidence that our years of expertise in mining analysis will help your project be a success.

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